Gone are the days where you need a printed, paper ticket to gain access to your favorite musician’s concerts. These days, technology is making admission for concert-goers easier than ever. And with all the extra service fees and taxes tacked on to the actual cost of the ticket, it’s about time this process was streamlined.

Just like we’re doing with our music-meets-game offering at FanLabel, technology will continue to be used to change your live music event experience. If you’re skeptical, read on. These tech developments are already rolling out:

Facial recognition

Earlier this week, Austin-based startup, Blink Identity, announced its revolutionary identity-in-motion technology, which identifies people as they walk past a sensor at full speed.

This means the technology can identify you in the blink of an eye as you enter a concert venue, eliminating the need for tickets entirely. Think Facebook’s automatic face recognition feature, but in real life.

“Blink Identity has created a fast, accurate and user-first identity service for live entertainment venues, solving the bottleneck problem and creating a preferential experience for consumers and venue owner alike,” Jordan Fudge of lead investor, Sinai Ventures, said in a press release.

Blink Identity is partnering with Live Nation, the world’s largest entertainment company, to test the technology in a variety of live entertainment venues.

RFID access control

Front Gate Tickets, also based in Austin, Texas, is dedicated to redefining the festival ticketing experience from both a promoter and fan perspective through technology and innovation.

Their RFID wristbands are a groundbreaking piece of technology for both fans and concert promoters. Concert-goers can register their wristband via email or Facebook, allowing event organizers to gain valuable demographic data on attendees. Not only that, but lines and wait times are greatly decreased, as venues are equipped with portals and handheld devices to scan wristbands, accelerating the entry process. It’s a win-win.

With 6.5 million wristbands sold to over 400 festivals at events like Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza, Front Gate Tickets is disrupting the industry.

Hologram performances

Perhaps you feel you were born in the wrong era. Or maybe one of your favorite musicians has, unfortunately, departed this Earth before you were able to catch them live in concert.

Without sounding too morbid, if you’ve ever wished you could see one of those artists, er, in the flesh, there’s still hope.

Thanks to technology, holographic imagery allows the powers that be to bring some of these artists back to life (at least on stage). While a bit controversial, previous from-the-grave sets include Tupac at Coachella in 2012 and Michael Jackson at the 2014 Billboard Awards.

This fall, catch “In Dreams: Roy Orbison In Concert—The Hologram Tour” as the show makes its 28-day run across North America, kicking off October 1 in Oakland, California and concluding November 19 in Clearwater, Florida.

Technology helps streamline our lives, making everyday minor annoyances, like waiting in line to see our favorite band, a little easier.

What cool (or not cool) tech advances have you noticed in the live event space? And what kind of technology are you hoping for to improve your future experiences at concerts? Comment below!

 

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